Become a Member

We are an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization with two primary goals:

  • Rescuing abandoned rabbits from local animal shelters and finding them permanent homes

  • Assisting humane societies through public education

Did You Know?

House Rabbit Society is the only rabbit rescue and education program that is nationwide, and indeed, we have members around the world. We have chapters in 19 states, and educators & fosterers in an additional 19 states plus Canada, Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore and Italy. How do we do all that? We owe our success to our volunteers, and to the generosity of our over 8,000 individual members who support this very important work. Without our volunteers, who without pay and outside of their “regular” jobs, put thousands of hours a year into educational and rescue work, we would cease functioning. But equally important are our members, who support us financially from year to year. Because HRS receives no government support, nor do we accept advertising dollars, we count on the generosity of our members to keep our rescue and education programs alive.

An Incredible Value

Since it was founded in 1988, HRS has prided itself on being a one-of-a-kind organization dedicated to an animal who is among the most harshly exploited of animals. Most rabbits are either bred and slaughtered or kept in laboratories. Even as pets, rabbits bear a heavy load of abuse. Typically kept alone in a small outdoor hutch, these gregarious animals spend their lives in lonely isolation, deprived of exercise, medical attention, human or animal contact, and, often, appropriate food, or fresh water. Many other rabbits are dumped in parks, forests, and by highways when their humans tire of them; an uncountable number are euthanized in animal shelters.

Education and Rescue

Since it was founded in 1988, HRS has prided itself on being a one-of-a-kind organization dedicated to an animal who is among the most harshly exploited of animals. Most rabbits are either bred and slaughtered or kept in laboratories. Even as pets, rabbits bear a heavy load of abuse. Typically kept alone in a small outdoor hutch, these gregarious animals spend their lives in lonely isolation, deprived of exercise, medical attention, human or animal contact, and, often, appropriate food, or fresh water. Many other rabbits are dumped in parks, forests, and by highways when their humans tire of them; an uncountable number are euthanized in animal shelters.